6.4 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Taiwan, 145 Missing

By Bryan Yeoh Quan Jin, International News Writer

On February 6, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake hit the east coast of Taiwan. The quake’s epicenter was in the East China Sea, about 13 miles north of the city of Hualien. A series of aftershocks ensued ranging from 4.9 to 5.7 on the Richter scale.

According to the Central News Agency, 145 people are still missing and emergency service personnel are working tirelessly to hunt for the missing people. Four buildings in the area are severely damaged. One of the buildings that collapsed in downtown Hualien housed the Marshal Hotel, where a majority of the injured were found. Heavy machinery is being employed to assist in the search and rescue process. Relief efforts are ongoing and President Tsai Ing-wen has promised not to stop until all are accounted for.

A member of the Seton Hall community who is currently living in a nearby district contributed a statement to CNN. Margaret Lewis who is an associate professor at Seton Hall University’s School of Law, said she felt prolonged swaying at her modern high-rise apartment building in Beitou District, in the northern part of the city. Lewis has been in Taiwan since last August as a Fullbright Research Fellow. She also mentioned in her statement that “Nothing broken, and two children slept peacefully through the event. We have since felt a few mild aftershocks. Nerves are jangled, but otherwise all appears well. I have not been outside to look for damage, but my expectation is that my area is generally fine.”

 

A version of this article appeared in the Tuesday, February 13th print edition.

Contact Bryan at

bryan.yeohquanjin@student.shu.edu

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